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Equality Act and my pituitary

PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:56 pm
by member_6285
Did you know that if you have a lifelong medical condition, such as hypopituitarism, this is classes as a disability under the Equality Act and gives you rights as an employee.

Re: Equality Act and my pituitary

PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 8:39 pm
by plum
what sort of rights?
to be honest, i chose not to disclose when i got my current job because being honest in interviews kept getting me responses such as "we like you but...."
however i DO tick the YES box whenever asked 'do you have a disability'

Re: Equality Act and my pituitary

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 5:50 pm
by Flower
member_6285 wrote:Did you know that if you have a lifelong medical condition, such as hypopituitarism, this is classes as a disability under the Equality Act and gives you rights as an employee.


I believe to be covered by the Equality Act it has to be considered how the individual would function without their medication. This is going to be individual to everyone of us, but through my employer's occupational health provider I was deemed to be covered by the preceding Disability Discrimination Act solely on the basis of growth hormone deficiency. How would I function without the GH treatment was their consideration.

If you are having to replace multiple hormones, I would have thought you would be covered by the act, but everyone is individual.

I do have additional physical disabilities, but it was the GH deficiency and the fact I am injecting medication that determined this conclusion. My physical disability is also covered separately.

My experience is to be honest on the job application, which usually only asks if you consider yourself disabled, without going into a lot of details. During interviews you should not be asked about any disabilities as this could be seen as discriminatory. If you choose to volunteer information about your health, that is a different matter. If you are successful at interview and are asked to complete a health declaration form, this is the time to declare your health/disabilities. Failing to declare health problems can lead to dismissal.

The bigger employers such as Civil Service, NHS, education, local government, universities are the employers I usually apply to as they have policies in place to be positive towards people with disabilities. Smaller employers may be a different matter.

If you are covered by the Equality Act, you do have certain protection such as making reasonable adjustments. One of my adjustments is to allow me to leave work early if I am very tired and I make up my hours on another day. I also have a special chair (back problems), special keyboard etc. I also have disabled parking as I have a blue badge due to my mobility problems. Someone I work with has just acquired a blue badge to park at work though they have no mobility problems (they can play sport including a round of golf without a buggy), but I believe they have some form of hypopituitarism.